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An Engineer’s Guide to Influencing Public Policy - 3 PDH

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Engineers often are called upon to interact with public policy makers in the course of their careers, their professional development, and in pursuit of personal interests. There are, however, fundamental differences in what motivates engineers and what motivates public policy makers. This course presents a realistic approach that engineers will need to follow if they hope to have any success in the public policy arena at the local, state and federal levels.
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An Engineer’s Guide to Influencing Public Policy PDH - Course Description

Engineers often are called upon to interact with public policy makers in the course of their careers, their professional development, and in pursuit of personal interests. There are, however, fundamental differences in what motivates engineers and what motivates public policy makers. This course presents a realistic approach that engineers will need to follow if they hope to have any success in the public policy arena at the local, state and federal levels.

Course Outline

I. An overview of legislative processes
A. A typical state legislative process
B. The federal legislative process
II. Why public policymakers are different from you and me
A. Linear- and non-linear thinkers
B. The hierarchy of people
C. Logical and emotional arguments
D. The hierarchy of people
E. The two most important words in public policy
II. Be issue-focused
A. Find issues and positions that can be winners
B. Establish alliances
C. Form single-issue entities to pursue objectives
III. Money is the root of all politics
A. How much money is needed to be a public policy player?
B. Where to get it
1. Alliance partners
2. Bargaining units?
C. Where to invest it
1. Know who has the power
2. Why your local legislator may not be a good investment
IV. The role of legislative staff
V. Committee hearings
A. Decisions are never made in public hearings
B. Nevertheless, a convincing presentation is important
1. Attention span
2. Presentations should be emotional, not logical
3. The role of handouts
 
This course includes a multiple-choice quiz at the end, which is designed to enhance the understanding of the course materials.
 
Learning Objectives
  • Learn the difference between linear and non-linear thinkers.
  • Learn the two most important words in influencing public policymakers.
  • Learn how to identify issues and positions that will win in the public policy arena.
  • Learn how to develop alliances that support your positions….and will win.
  • Learn where to spend money….and where not to spend it.
  • Learn what legislative staff can….and cannot….do.
  • Learn how to make public presentations to policy makers (i.e. in committee hearings). And why they are helpful, but
rarely critical.
  • Learn the importance of “handouts”….and how to use them.

  • The importance of forming single-issue alliances to pursue objectives with a realistic understanding of the roles of power

and money.
 
Intended Audience
 
Anyone in the construction and infrastructure industries interested in influencing public policymakers will find this seminar valuable. This includes….
Civil, Structural, Mechanical and Electrical Engineers
Architects
Contractors
Local public works and infrastructure officials.
 
Benefit for Attendee
 
You will learn the “rules” of the public policy game, and how to play within those rules….
 
The Rules of the Game
 
You will learn the fundamental difference between linear thinkers and non-linear thinkers and why it is critical to understand this when undertaking to influence public policy makers. You will learn about the hierarchy of people so you will know who can and cannot help you to achieve your objectives. And this understanding will lead you to learn the two words that must guide everything you do in the public policy arena.
 
How to Play the Game
 
You will learn the fundamentals of picking your issues and distinguishing between winners and losers. You will learn the importance of single-issue entities and the importance of establishing alliances to pursue them cooperatively. And you will learn why you need to focus your resources and efforts on those policy makers who have the power to help you achieve your objectives….and not waste them on policy makers who are not in a position to move your agenda forward. You will also learn about techniques such as “emotional arguments” and “handouts” that will not win your case but will help you to win it.

Course Introduction
 
It is impossible to influence public policy without a realistic appreciation of the interpersonal dynamics of legislative and other government bodies. This course will tell you how engineers need to approach public policy makers if they want to be effective and persuasive. It is from the perspective of a professional engineer who spent nine years as a principal staff member for the California Legislature responsible for making recommendations to the Members on infrastructure issues. In this capacity he prepared reports to the Membership, testified before legislative committees, and provided one-on-one information and recommendations to Members, committee staff and lobbyists. In earlier years, he was also active in the governmental affairs programs of engineering organizations in California. His experience runs contrary to some of the conventional wisdom in the engineering and construction community, and projects dim prospects for engineers to influence public policy unless the profession adopts a realistic approach to dealing with policymakers. Although presented from the perspective of state government, the seminar is equally applicable to the profession’s interests at the local and federal levels.

Course Summary

This course will give you a realistic view of what engineers need to do if they want to be effective in influencing public policy makers at the local, state and federal level. It will give you an understanding of what motivates public policy makers and where engineers need to focus their resources if they hope influence the course of public policy, whether related to your job or your personal interests.

Reviews

Monday, 19 December 2016
I have to say, I am embarrassed for the Engineering Continuing Education site to even have such a low level “course” available. I took this course because I had an interest in forming and influencing public policy. I knew I was in trouble when the course began with “This is a tale told by an Engineer who ventured into a land seldom visited by his kind” and then proceeded to speak of himself in third person. He states that he was unsuccessful in his policy efforts. If they were written as half-hazard and discombobulated as this “course”, I can see why. He claims to be a “linear” rule and fact-oriented thinker who failed with policy makers because they were “non-linear” emotional and self-serving thinkers. This “course” was incredibly emotional and self-serving. I received nothing supportive from it. I struggled to answer the questions on the test because I knew, in order to receive my PDH certificate, I would have to answer as he wrote the paper, which I found to be based completely on his own personal opinion, rather than facts. Terrible. Terrible.
Marlene L. Marquez

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